Love and Time Travel

After a recent long look at the dreaded to.be.read pile, I mentally instructed myself to not bring any more books into the house (discounting research books because, yes, I am starting to work again after the fallow summer). I even mentioned it in Annie’s ’7 things’ meme and since I have made some headway with one thing listed there, I decided to be strict.

At which point someone lent me The Lady and the Unicorn and The Virgin Blue by Tracey Chevalier. This was my own fault for telling anyone who cared how much I enjoyed Girl With a Pearl Earring (see several previous posts). On the plus side, I did also get two books off the mountain and read them as well: Longtitude by Dava Sorbel and The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. The former was found in a charity shop but had been on my ‘ought to read one day’ list whilst the latter was in a 3 for 2 with Going Postal and The Lambs of London. Running through the books are themes of craftsmanship and/or time, so it seems like my recent reading has at least been compiling ideas. So…the books…

The Lady and the Unicorn
by Tracey Chevalier
fiction | C20th | historical
Multiple narrators in two worlds which run in parallel. Some characters cross from one to another, most notably the painter Nicolas des Innocents, but also the middleman Léon Le Vieux. The interweaving of the narrators and perspectives clearly mimicking the tapestries about which the novel revolves. Unfortunately, for me the voices of the different narrators were not distinct enough. Whilst the language they used varied according to their social position, gender etc, the tone seemed more constant throughout. Did it create a field of colour containing characters restricted by circumstances? Yes, but it didn’t engage me with them.

Longtitude
by Dava Sorbel
non-fiction | C20th | historical
In contrast, the recounting of a family’s attempt to master longtitude in bitter competition to the Royal Astronomer and others, captures the emotions. It’s the classic underdog story, obviously, which automatically puts the reader on the side of the Harrisons, but Sorbel explains the logistics and mechanics of creating time so simply that you marvel at the story. The way in which time became delineated and contains is something which fascinates me: I love the way in which time in Britain was unified by the railways and that, until then, everyone ran on their own time according to their longtitude.

The Time Traveller’s Wife
by Audrey Niffenegger
fiction | C21st
This is one of those books that everyone appears to be reading, so I read it. The plot is very neatly fractured and then reconstructed. The whole grandfather paradox element is given very short shrift: the protagonist tells his wife that he has tried and concluded that the multiverse theory of time travel doesn’t work. All of which is fine and it is enjoyable to see a SF conceit being used well in contemporary fiction: quite why people treat SF as contemptible whilst reading and watching a lot of popular fiction (written, televisual and cinematic) based on SF premises is beyond me. However, the main problem I had with The Time Traveller’s Wife is that I am not fond on contemporary American fiction. The clipped straightforward sentences with their lack of rhythm do not engage me with the story. The denoument of the novel should contain pathos, a sadness about the inevitability of the protagonists to change events, which should make me care. For me, it didn’t. Technically, this is a good book but that excellence is in the narrative and the structure, not the prose itself.

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4 Responses to “Love and Time Travel”

  1. Stuart Douglas Says:

    I enjoyed the Timne Travellers Wife, but for me the denoument didn’t work because it just seemed so bloody rushed. I had been hoping to see how such a relationship (and family) would cope and survive long-term once the two protagonists met up “properly”, but instead everything just got chopped off at the knees, which was disappointing.

  2. Stewart M. Says:

    I wholeheartedly agree. Contemporary American fiction is utter tripe.

  3. Lisa_SFF Says:

    Nice to see Gibson on the list… Difference Engine is quite fun, but I really enjoyed Pattern Recognition, which it seems they will be making into a movie.

    Also good on the list was Life of Pi. Interesting – Lovely Bones, though kind of sad… Really loved seeing the Russians there, Master and Margarita is amazing, and the Dostoevsky are well worth reading.

  4. Mags Says:

    I love my Russians, especially Dostoevsky. I did plan to name my cats after Russian writers or characters, so I’d go into the garden and yell “Dostoevesky!” or “Boris!”.

    I’m just updating the list now with yet more books found in charity shops.


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